Saturday, December 15, 2012

When Then?



















According to the statistics, 2012 has been just a sort of average year when it comes to random mass killings by men with guns. This is just the new normal, I guess.

On Tuesday, I man with a gun opened fire in a Happy Valley, Oregon shopping mall, randomly killing and wounding innocent shoppers.

On Thursday the Michigan Legislature approved a law that permits carrying concealed weapons in schools and day care centers.

On Friday yet another man with a gun slaughtered 20 kindergarteners and 7 other people in Newton, Connecticut using guns owned by a teacher who worked at the Sandy Hook Elementary School where the tragedy occurred.

White House Press Secretary Jay Carney refused to answer questions about gun control, saying there will be a time for discussion, but "I don't think today is that day."

When then?

Meanwhile, the gun fetishists get to own the national dialog, boasting about how if they had been there with their own arsenal, they would have made like Rambo, and all would today be happy in Happy Valley. Only about half of Americans favor stricter gun control laws, a heart-breakingly small percentage considering this new normal nightmare. Americans own 300 million guns. Last night, a friend, in a sad moment of gallows humor, suggested that in the future every one of us will walk around with our own personal attack drone hovering over us, just waiting to unload on anyone who looks at us the wrong way. This is sick. 

Today is the day to talk about gun control. Every day is the day. Silence is complicity with the new normal.

And, good lord, the answer is not to arm kindergarten teachers.


I put a lot of time and effort into this blog. If you'd like to support me please consider a small contribution to the cause. Thank you!
Bookmark and Share -->

14 comments:

Art Project Girl said...

Thank you~ this needs to be talked about today. I live close to the tragedy and already conversations are changing. We hate to admit it, but unless it effects you people move on. The guns remain and the tragedies continue. Peace Education in the schools as well

Juliet Robertson said...

It is terribly sad what has happened in Newtown an I wonder how many other communities are going to have to go through the same torment, again and again if proper action is not taken.

The other gun stats are equally grim. Whilst other nations have perhaps tens of gun deaths per year, I've heard this rises to around 8000 in the USA. But don't quote me here!

The BBC is reporting the event quite differently to CNN and Fox. We got parts of Obama's speech which were quickly ignored/edited on US channels. Also different Qs and comments about gun law.

heather said...

It would be nice if we could also open a national conversation on mental health -and the sad state of affairs that faces anyone with mental illness in terms of getting reliable, quality care - in the wake of these tragedies.

Floor Pie said...

I work with students with behavior challenges, and I am "armed" with a radio to call for assistance if I ever need it. Sometimes I don't happen to have the radio on me when I need it most. And once a student managed to get the radio away from me and attempted to use it as a weapon (to throw at someone). If I were armed with an actual gun, somebody would be dead by now. Probably me.

janofmi said...

I agree that the issue of gun control needs to be talked about, but the bigger issue is mental health. Often those over 18 with mental health issues have parents, siblings, partners and care givers that a virtually helpless to do anything because of the laws that give the power to the individual. Schools have their hands tied because of least restrictive environment rules that make it so difficult to get the help that children need when they are suffering from mental illness. A friend of mine has been repeatedly kicked, hit, bitten or assaulted with by books and chairs. She cannot get the help that she needs to remove this violent child from her classroom.

So, yes gun control, especially of weapons designed to kill people, must be addressed. The well being of people with mental health issues must be dealt with just as strongly.

Rebecca said...

Gun control would be good to stop other violent crimes. In these cases though, it would not prevent them. These shootings are preventable, but removing access from guns is just a small part of the picture. http://www.janisjourney.org/index.php?option=com_myblog&show=the-cycle-repeated-burn-it-down.html&Itemid=94

Anonymous said...

Stop the gnashing of teeth, asking rhetorical questions. I say again, when will the people of America demonstrate their sadness - their anger by peaceful marching in the streets? Is the gun issue perceived to be too big or are America's citizens unwilling to stand up and be counted? Be America the Brave - not America the almost Brave!

T. Wood said...

We have strict gun laws in Australia ever since the port Arthur massacre many many years ago. Best decision our politicians ever made. I grew up not knowing anyone who owned a gun and I don't anyone who has a clue on how to get one. Unless you live on a farm here they just aren't necessary. I don't understand why America drags its feet on this issue.

Nikoli said...

It is an unfortunate and sad truth that so many in America are okay with the periodic massacre of innocents as a price for our (their) liberties. I will remind every person that opposes gun regulations that is EXACTLY what they are asking for. You cannot spin it any other way.

Gun restrictions work. Australia had 13 mass shootings in 18 years before enacting major restrictions in 1996, in the 14 years after that, ZERO. Murder rate with firearms dropped by 40% and suicide by firearm dropped by more than 50%. IT WORKS. Couple that with mental health access, along with mandatory training/testing/proper storage with firearms purchases and I guarantee the accidental deaths by firearms will drop as well.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/16/opinion/sunday/kristof-do-we-have-the-courage-to-stop-this.html

My home, and his school should be the safest places that my child visits.

Danielle @52 Brand New said...

Yes, we need to have a serious discussion about gun control. I see so much sadness and outrage expressed in my friend's Facebook posts. If we take the time to get off Facebook, and email our congressmen, our sadness and anger could come together to make a real change in our country. This is not a knee-jerk reaction like some people in the media are saying. Columbine was 13 years ago. School shootings happen every year now. This conversation on gun control has been brewing inside us for too long.

Anonymous said...

May I suggest citing evidence based research with your opinion?

Teacher Tom said...

@Anonymous . . . Our Aussie friend above have offered some pretty compelling evidence. Here's another source from my local, conservative, newspaper: http://seattletimes.com/html/nationworld/2019907299_shootingdebate15.html

Anonymous said...

Tom, what do you think about weapon role play in nursery? Somehow I am ok with swords an arrows, but just have a gut feeling that guns are wrong...

Anonymous said...

Tom, what do you think about weapon role play in nursery? Somehow I am ok with swords an arrows, but just have a gut feeling that guns are wrong...

Related Posts with Thumbnails
Technorati Profile